Tag Archives: partner spotlight

Partner Spotlight: Boyce Thompson Institute

Feature Image: Guillaume Bauchet (2nd from left) guides workshop participants through a field exercise during the 2017 NextGen Cassava annual meeting. Photo by Bryan Ellerbrock.

More than 10 international institutions are affiliated with NextGen Cassava. In our partner spotlights, we feature profiles on individual institutions and the role each institution plays in the project.

The Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) based in Ithaca, New York, is one of the founding partners of the NextGen Cassava project. Researchers at BTI code and maintain Cassavabase, an open-access database where cassava breeders can upload the genetic and phenotypic data from their field trials and access data from other breeders around the world.

Establishing a centralized database for  information tracking, genotypic and phenotypic data, and Genomic Selection (GS) prediction analyses was one of the main objectives of NextGen Cassava in Phase 1. Moving into Phase 2, Cassavabase will continue to develop in response to the feedback and needs of breeders. We interviewed Guillaume Bauchet and Lukas Mueller of BTI to learn more about the institute, their work, and how they fit into the NextGen Cassava project.

What is BTI’s role in NextGen Cassava? What are the main activities/objectives being accomplished here?

BTI’s main role in NextGen Cassava is developing  the Cassavabase site as a one-stop shop for NextGen’s breeding data. Our main activities include:

  • Managing data: we handle NextGen’s phenotypic and genotypic data management
  • Developing tools: we support breeders in their day to day activities through breeding database development
  • Capacity building: we train and assist NextGen collaborators in analyzing and bioinformatics.
Lukas Mueller at GCP21 Benin

Lukas Mueller of BTI delivered a presentation on Cassavabase at the 2018 Global Cassava Partnership for the 21st Century Conference in Couteau, Benin. Photo by Canaan Boyer

Are there any Masters/PhD students funded by NextGen at BTI? What is their work focused on?
Currently, there are no Masters/PhD students funded by NextGen at BTI, but we have a lot of institutional representatives involved as data managers/data analysts.

Has the partnership/involvement with NextGen benefited BTI? In what ways?NextGen has been an eye-opener on African agriculture and certainly a great asset to BTI. It has allowed us to see current and future plant research challenges and opportunities.

How does NextGen fit into BTI’s overall mission and goals?
BTI’s aim is to make valuable contributions to general scientific knowledge, biology, and medicine. William Boyce Thompson, BTI’s founder, was convinced that “agriculture, food supply, and social justice are linked.” This is also true of the future of the African continent. 

From its creation, BTI’s mission encompasses the “creation through genetic research of hardier, more nutritious, disease-resistant crop plants and more viable seeds; the study of insects that damage food crops; and the production of new pesticides.”

With NextGen, developing a breeding database for Africa’s major staple crop is fully in line with BTI’s vision and institutional missions.

05_cassavabase

As of the end of Phase 1, Cassavabase hosts a great amount of data related to cassava trials.

How do you see NextGen and BTI’s partnership moving forward?
Developing the “digital ecosystem” around breeding is a continuous, major goal within NextGen where BTI’s contribution is significant.

This will work in conjunction with new research activities developed in Phase 2, such as farmer’s knowledge, food preferences, and related methods/technologies (surveys, near-infrared spectroscopy) to tackle underlying research questions. 

Partner Spotlight: National Crops Resources Research Institute

More than 10 institutions are affiliated with NextGen Cassava. In our partner spotlights, we feature profiles on individual institutions and the role each institution plays in the project.
The National Crops Resources Research Institute (NaCRRI) has been a founding partner of the NextGen Cassava project since its inception. We interviewed Robert Kawuki, cassava breeder at the National Agricultural Research Organization of Uganda and NextGen Cassava country lead, to learn more about the institution’s collaborations.

Header Image: NextGen researchers stand at a NextGen Cassava uniform field trial in Serere District, Uganda. Left to right: Alfred Ozimati, Marnin Wolfe, Robert Kawuki, Williams Esuma, and Chiedozie Egesi. Photo provided by Robert Kawuki.

Continue reading

Partner Spotlight: Tanzania Agricultural Research Institute

By Samantha Hautea

More than 10 institutions are affiliated with NextGen Cassava. In our partner spotlights, we feature profiles on individual institutions and the role each institution plays in the project.

Tanzania officially joined the NextGen Cassava project as a partner in 2016. The partnership has been a productive one, and many positive results have come out of the collaboration. We interviewed Heneriko Kulembeka and Kiddo Mtunda, leads for the NextGen project in Tanzania, to learn more about the work being done in the country.

Header Photo: Heneriko Kulembeka (red) and Kiddo Mtunda (yellow) of TARI with Jonas Ambrose of the Mikocheni Agricultural Research Institute at a cassava seedling nursery in Chambezi Station. Photo by Samantha Hautea 

What is your institution’s name and its role in your country? What kinds of activities does it engage in?

Our institution’s name is the Tanzania Agricultural Research Institute (TARI). This is a semi-autonomous body of the government under the Ministry of Agriculture, responsible for conducting, regulating and coordinating all agricultural research activities in Tanzania. TARI’s mission is to generate and disseminate the application of knowledge and agricultural technologies as catalysts for change in achieving agricultural productivity, food and nutrition security, environmental sustainability, and economic growth, while involving stakeholders in the country and the global community.

Specific functions of TARI include but are not limited to: 1) Conduct, promote and coordinate basic, applied and strategic agricultural research; 2) Advise the government on the formulation of national policies, laws and regulatory frameworks for promoting and regulating agricultural research; 3) Set national agricultural research agenda and priorities in collaboration with key stakeholders.

On behalf of TARI, NextGen Cassava activities in Tanzania are conducted and coordinated by TARI Ukiriguru in Mwanza. Other institutions involved are TARI Ilonga, TARI Kibaha, and TARI Naliendele.

IMG_3799

Heneriko Kulembeka at a cassava field trial at TARI Ukiriguru, Mwanza. Photo by Chris Knight.

What is TARI’s role in NextGen Cassava? 

TARI’s role in NextGen includes germplasm acquisition and utilization, testing genomic selection training population in Year 1 and Cycle 1 materials from current crosses to develop genomic prediction models, optimizing flowering and seed set,  integrating phenotyping tools like NIRS into breeding program, implementing on-farm/gender-responsive activities, and capacity building (human and infrastructure).

IMG_2552

Kiddo Mtunda at a cassava seedling nursery in Chambezi station. Photo by Canaan Boyer

Are there any Masters/PhD students funded by NextGen at TARI? On what are they focused?

Yes. We had two TARI MSc students trained by NextGen Project Phase 1 on cassava breeding. In Phase 2, there are potential MSc/PhD students identified who will also focus on cassava breeding.

Has the partnership/involvement with NextGen benefited TARI? In what ways?

In Phase 1, TARI was able to accomplish the following:
a) Develop a training population
b) Estimate breeding values
c) Develop selection indices using economic weights
d) Select parents and planting crossing blocks
e) Identify testing environments
f) Prioritize traits prioritization and standardize processes
g) Conduct training on R, GS, experimental design, process maps and selection

In the future, we expect that researchers from NextGen and TARI will continue to work closely as one team.

How does NextGen fit into TARI’s overall mission and goals?

NextGen aims to increase the rate of crop improvement using new technologies, a goal which is in line with TARI’s mission as explained above.

Looking to the future, how do you see NextGen and TARI’s partnership developing in the next five years?

In the next five years, NextGen and TARI’s relationship will become stronger and stronger.

Partner Spotlight: NRCRI

More than 10 institutions are affiliated with NextGen Cassava. In our partner spotlights, we feature profiles on individual institutions and the role they play in the project.

The National Root Crops Research Institute (NRCRI) in Nigeria has been a NextGen Cassava partner since the inception of the project. We interviewed Dr. Joseph Onyeka, NextGen Cassava breeding lead and head of  the Pathology and Micro Biotechnology Unit at NRCRI, to learn more about the institution and its work.

DSC01777

Dr. Joseph Onyeka in his office at NRCRI.

Dr. Onyeka explained the benefits of the collaboration: “Moving forward, the partnership between NextGen and NRCRI will not only lead to enhancing the efficiency of NRCRI to develop new cassava varieties, but will actually extend to delivering new superior cassava varieties to Nigerian farmers. NRCRI is a leading institution for cassava breeding in Africa and had provided technical backstopping for other African NARs in the past through the cassava breeding Community of Practice (CoP). NRCRI hopes to take the advantage of this network in the region to create a spillover of the benefits from NextGen project to other countries in the region.”

Read the full interview below:

What is NRCRI’s role in NextGen Cassava? What are the main activities/objectives being accomplished here?
NRCRI as the Nigerian national partner of the NextGen project is involved in the implementation of activities under various objectives: Implementing and empirically testing Genomic Selection in African breeding programs, whereby genomic selection is used to speed-up the process of developing and selecting feature varieties for release to farmers. NRCRI is involved in the identification of methods to improve cassava flowering and seed set, which provides opportunity for breeders to tap desirable traits from genetic backgrounds with poor flowering ability. NRCRI is also involved in the development of centralized cassava database through the contribution of information to the database and the application of modern tools for precise data collection. The institute is also a key player in the current drive aimed at understanding gender-related as well as end-user preferred traits in cassava to aid breeders in designing their breeding objectives. The institute is gradually moving to a standardized and rapid throughput phenotyping for key traits using near infra-red spectrometer in cassava breeding.

Are there any Masters/PhD students funded by NextGen at NRCRI? What is their work focused on?
NRCRI has two PhD students funded by the NextGen project. They are Miss Lydia Ezenwaka who is registered with the West African Center for Crop Improvement (WACCI), University of Ghana with a research focus on Genome-wide association study of cassava green mite resistance and other associated traits in Manihot esculenta; and Mr Ugochukwu Ikeogu who is registered with Cornell University, Ithaca, USA with a research focus on high throughput phenotyping and genomic selection for quality traits in cassava.

file-1

Okoro Maria Justin, a member of the NRCRI gender team and cassava research program, examines a NextGen Cassava field trial.

In what ways has the partnership/involvement with NextGen benefited NRCRI?
NRCRI involvement with NextGen has greatly benefited the institution in many ways which include improved capacity and efficiency in breeding for farmer-preferred cassava varieties, development of human research capacity through short trainings and workshops, upgrade of laboratory and field research facilities including field vehicles for easy movement.

How does NextGen fit into NRCRI’s overall mission and goals?
The NextGen project aptly fits into the main research focus of NRCRI which has the national mandate for genetic improvement of root and tuber crops including cassava in Nigeria.

How do you see NextGen and NRCRI’s partnership moving forward?
Moving forward, the partnership between NextGen and NRCRI will not only lead to enhancing the efficiency of NRCRI to develop new cassava varieties, but will actually extend to delivering new superior cassava varieties to Nigerian farmers. NRCRI is a leading institution for cassava breeding in Africa and had provided technical backstopping for other African NARs in the past through the cassava breeding Community of Practice (CoP). NRCRI hopes to take the advantage of this network in the region to create a spillover of the benefits from NextGen project to other countries in the region.

Any final thoughts?
Being the only research institute in Africa solely devoted to root and tuber crops, particularly cassava, the goal of NextGen Project is the goal of NRCRI.