NextGen Cassava 2017-2018 Graduates

Ensuring the future of cassava breeding will require training young scientists to excel. We are proud of NextGen’s new graduates and are excited to see to their contributions to research in the years to come.

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(L to R) Olumide Alabi, Lydia Ezenwaka, Chiedozie Egesi, and Ismail Kayondo at the University of Ghana. Photo provided by Chiedozie Egesi.

Olumide Alabi, a member of International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA)‘s cassava breeding program, researched the empirical estimation of genetic gains in cassava breeding using genomic selection in a one-year breeding cycle. His work demonstrated the utility of the technology and its implications for African cassava breeders.

Lydia Ezenwaka, research officer at NRCRI Umudike Nigeria, worked on genomic markers linked with cassava green mite (CGM). CGM is a dry season pest that damages leaves of cassava plants, which reduces photosynthesis. She identified resistance single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for use in breeding world-wide.

Ismail Kayondo, of the National Crops Resources Research Institute, identified genomic markers linked with resistance to cassava brown streak disease using wild cassava relatives and CBSD resistance QTL mapping. This work will help develop resistant varieties that can be used to improve cassava lines in East Africa, as well as for pre-breeding cassava lines to protect West Africa from this disease.

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(L to R) Roberto Lozano, Alfred Ozimati, Jean-Luc Jannink, Ikeogu Ugochukwu Nathaniel and Uche Godfrey Okeke at Cornell University. Photo provided by Jean-Luc Jannink.

Roberto Lozano, working with Jean-Luc Jannink at the Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics at Cornell University, focused on ways to improve Genomic Selection (GS) accuracies by incorporating information from separate gene annotation and transcriptomics experiments. His research, upstream of our current breeding efforts, will increase their efficiency as we incorporate the results.

Uche Godfrey Okeke, who also worked with Jean-Luc, worked on developing genomic prediction models for for multiple trait and multi-environment trials. These models create a better picture of the correlations between traits, improving selection for the many traits required to make a good variety. They also allow better targeting of new varieties to agroecological zones.

Ikeogu Ugochukwu and Alfred Ozimati are slated to graduate soon. Ugochukwu, working with NRCRI, Umudike, Nigeria researched high throughput assessment of cassava root quality traits using near infrared and visual reflectance measurements. Alfred is from NaCCRI Namulonge, Uganda, and his research for NextGen focuses on genomic selection for Cassava Brown Streak Disease (CBSD) and yield-related parameters. He has developed tools to help pre-emptive breeding for CBSD resistance in West Africa, to prevent what could be a devastating outbreak of the disease if it were to arrive there.

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