Monthly Archives: September 2015

Joy Adiele Attends AWARD’s Enhancing Negotiation Skills Course

AWARD logoJoy Adiele, PhD student at Wageningen University and researcher at National Root Crops Research Institute (NRCRI), Umudike, Nigeria, recently attended the African Women in Agricultural Research and Development (AWARD) course, Enhancing Negotiation Skills, in Nairobi, Kenya, supported by NEXTGEN Cassava. Below is Joy’s report on the course:

The course began with a lecture from Deborah M. Kolb, the founder of the Center for Gender in Organizations at the Simmons College School of Management and former executive director of the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School.

Joy Adiele receives AWARD certificateThe one-week course was focused on negotiation processes and how women fare in them, including understanding the ways in which organization’s policies and practices, though appearing gender neutral, could have unintended but differential impacts on different groups of men and women. I learnt how to adopt negotiation skills in different capacities that could directly initiate other changes and help realize joint gains, especially in gender-related issues. I got to develop some practical skills on how to identify potential wins and craft strategies to achieve them. Now I understand the simple actions that oneself, people, or organizations can take that could accumulate to create substantive change.

AWARD Negotiation Skills course group photoThe Enhancing Negotiation Skills course is of essence for women who want to break the glass ceiling. The ability and confidence it impacts into one is invaluable. I am grateful to the Next Generation Cassava Breeding Project for giving me the opportunity to participate in such a life-changing course. It is a needed skill for my career success.

NEXTGEN PhD Student Roberto Lozano Attends Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Course

NEXTGEN Cassava PhD student Roberto Lozano recently attended a two-week course on Statistical Methods for Functional Genomics at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), and he reports on it here:

CSHL is considered among the leading research institutions in the world in molecular biology and genetics. Not only because of its history (considerable long list of noble laureates) but also for the current research taking place there.

Part of my research as a graduate student is focused on using high-throughput genomic data to identify functional regions across the cassava genome and try to use this information to improve Cassava GS-assisted breeding. Some of the high-throughput genomic data will come from transcriptome sequencing, chromatin footprinting and methylation profiling analysis.

Statistical Methods for Functional Genomics course attendees

Statistical Methods for Functional Genomics course attendees

High-throughput sequencing has become a major technique in biological research. However analyzing big data sets, products of these technologies, carries some challenges that are not always properly tackled. These kinds of errors can threaten the biological inferences that are made. All the techniques that I planned on using for my research carry some unique difficulties and sometimes complex statistical principles underlying their analysis methods. This course tackled all those techniques, and the instructors and speakers have wide experience working with that kind of data. That’s what initially caught my attention to apply for this course.

DNA Sculpture at CSHL

DNA Sculpture at CSHL

After taking it I have to admit that it was as good as it could get. All the instructors were great; each of them leads their own top-notch research group, and they were really helpful and resourceful. The invited speakers were great as well, showing some of the latest techniques and applications of next-gen sequencing. The attendees came from a wide variety of fields and from all around the world, working in both Academia and private companies, and the wide variety of their study fields (cancer, neurobiology, plant genomics, immunology and more) really assured lots of interesting discussions. Finally I had to mention that even the location of the Cold Spring Harbor Labs was something else, a beautiful environment that let people focus on their research.